Mallard 75

    On 3 July 1938, the A4 class locomotive Mallard raced down Stoke Bank at 126mph to set a new steam locomotive world speed record. That record still stands.

    During 2013 and 2014 we marked the 75th anniversary of Mallard's achievement with the Mallard 75 series of commemorative events, including spectacular opportunities to see the world's fastest locomotive united with its five surviving sister locomotives.

    Many thanks to all those who came to the Great Goodbye event at Shildon between the 15 and 23 February to celebrate the six A4's. We had nearly 120,000 visitors to Locomotion over the course of the 8 days!

    The final phase of the Mallard75 project is now counting down to the departure of Dwight D Eisenhower and Dominion of Canada for Liverpool docks.

    Both will remain at Shildon in the Collection building until 21 April, so you can still see them over Easter before they make their journey preparations on the 23 and 23 April.

    Dwight D Eisenhower and Dominion of Canada will leave Shildon for Liverpool Seaforth Docks on 28th April and will depart the UK on 8 May on board the ACL vessel Atlantic Conveyor. Please note, the ports are not open to the public due to customs and excise regulations, however we will be sharing images and footage from the dockside in early May.

    A retrospective of the Great Gathering story in pictures:

    Sir Nigel Gresley (1876-1941) was the Chief Mechanical Engineer of the London and North Eastern Railway. He is photographed here at the Doncaster Works with the A4 Pacific No 4498 he designed and which was named after him. Gresley's streamlined A4 series cut the King's Cross to Newcastle journey time to just four hours in the 1930's.

    Mallard reached 126 m.p.h racing down Stoke Bank on 3 July 1938. Here, the members of the crew reflect on their achievement following Mallard's record breaking run in 1938. Mallard was the 28th of the 35 A4 class of express locomotives designed by Gresley and had particular design features to ensure speedy passage on the East Coast Line on which it usually operated. This included an eight-wheeled corridor tender which uniquely allowed the crew access to the train behind, so the team could work shifts without stopping the locomotive.

    Dominion of Canada being transported in September 2012.

    Mallard getting a freshen-up and re-paint in the National Railway Museum's workshop prior to the Great Gathering.

    Dwight D Eisenhower arrive at Liverpool Docks (credit: Ant Clausen)

    Dominion of Canada with the cargo ship in the background (credit: Ant Clausen).

    Dominion of Canada getting a complete cosmetic restoration.

    Dominion of Canada - restoration finishing touches require a steady hand

    The team at Locomotion Shildon responsible for the restoration work of Dominion of Canada.

    Both Dominion of Canada and Dwight D Eisenhower spent considerable time in our workshops and the teams at York and Shildon shared the workload prior to the Great Gatherings. Here Heritage Painters put the finishing touches to Dwight.

    The classic line-up shot of the 6 A4 locomotives in Great Hall, York.

    The Great Goodbye at Shildon between 15-23 February 2014. Visitors sent through many wonderful photographs of the Great Goodbye, this one was kindly submitted by Fionnbarr Kennedy.

    The Great Goodbye at Shildon between 15-23 February 2014. Picture courtesy York Loco images.

    The Great Goodbye at Shildon between 15-23 February 2014. Picture courtesy York Loco images.

    The Great Goodbye at Shildon between 15-23 February 2014. Picture courtesy York Loco images.

    The Great Goodbye at Shildon between 15-23 February 2014. Picture courtesy of 60809 images.

    • 0
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
    • 10
    • 11
    • 11
    • 11
    • 11
    • 11

    See also

    Background: Mallard 75